**Please note: To see the photos contained within a post, you must click on the title of the post to open it separately. Why? I don't know. I just know that it needs to be done to see the pics. :)

Strawberry Pound Cake

A hidden gem of vintage cast iron is the small pan.  Everybody understands the need for a good sized skillet that you can cook for your family in, but sometimes people will look at their small pans, like their No. 3’s, and scratch their heads.

We did a whole lot of baking over many weeks to give you some ideas.  Small pans are incredibly versatile, and once you’ve read this you’ll be brimming with ideas of how you can use yours.  For this article, we used four Wagner #3 skillets.  A Skillet Size Search will show you all our No. 3’s, right here.

We also took a lot of our inspiration from the 2017 edition of “Cast Iron Baking” magazine, which was written by Hoffman Media, the folks behind Southern Cast Iron and Taste of the South magazines.  To get your own copy of Cast Iron Baking magazine, just click here, or to get a subscription to Southern Cast Iron, click here.

Firstly, the easy one – Eggs for one!   If you’re making yourself one or two eggs, you don’t want a big 10″ or 12″ pan.  These smaller pans are just perfect for when you’re frying up some breakfast just for yourself.  They are small, light and take about 10 seconds to clean afterwards.

Second, Mac & Cheese!   Whether it’s from a box, or made from scratch, mac & cheese is perfect for the #3.  Best of all, you can serve it directly in the skillet.  The one pictured was made using Cracker Barrel “Sharp Cheddar & Bacon”, and it was good.

 

Of course, there are also Desserts! You can bake mini skillet cakes in #3’s.  We used this Strawberry Pound Cake recipe from the cover of the 2017 edition of “Cast Iron Baking” magazine.

We think that maybe the cakes are a little large for one person, but they are perfect for two!  Our friend Bonnie was a taste tester and liked them so much she took all of the cakes home!

Please note that the recipe produced 4 x #3 skillets of cake, so adjust the quantities if you don’t have four #3 skillets.

Skillet Cookies!!!

Who doesn’t love a warm skillet cookie?  This is something you can eat right out of the pan!

The recipe we used was from page 86 of the magazine, that we adapted from one big skillet, to 4 smaller ones.  The recipe was perfect for either, but when cooking in the smaller skillets, take them out of the oven at the earlier end of the suggested cooking times.  It tasted even better than it looked!

Cast Iron Baking also gave us permission to share the recipe, which is at the bottom of the page.

Brownies

If you love the crusty edge pieces, then the smaller pans give you all that!

Cobbler

Cobblers are PERFECT for a single serving in the #3’s.  We celebrated our first spring meal on the deck with a cobbler!

 

Tips

All the recipes produced 4 skillets of food The original baking times were perfect, just stick to the lower end of the recommended range The original cooking temperatures in the recipes were perfect.

Chocolate Chip Skillet Cookie

Reprinted with permission from Cast Iron Baking Magazine 2017

5 tablespoons unsalted butter (softened) 1 cup firmly packed dark brown sugar 1 large egg 0.5 teaspoon vanilla extract 2 cups all-purpose flour 1 teaspoon baking soda 0.5 teaspoon kosher salt 1.5 tablespoons heavy whipping cream 1 cup semisweet chocolate morsels Vanilla Ice Cream – to serve

First Preheat oven to 350’F.  Spray a 10″ cast-iron skillet (or four No. 3 skillets) with cooking spray

Second In a large bowl, beat butter and sugars with a mixer at medium speed until fluffy, 3 – 4 mins, stopping to scrape the sides of the bowl.  Add egg and vanilla, beating to combine.

Third In a medium bowl, whisk together flour, baking soda and salt.  Gradually add flour mixture to butter mixture, beating just until combined.  With mixer on low speed, gradually add cream.  Fold in chocolate morsels.  Press dough into prepared skillet.

Last Bake until golden brown, 20 – 25 minutes (20 mins for No. 3 pans).  Serve with ice cream.

 

Links

Cast Iron Baking 2017

Southern Cast Iron Magazine

Taste of the South Magazine

Cast-Iron-Guide-Preseasoned-Griswold-Cast-Iron-Collection-640x640

We love estate sales for finding treasures that we can restore, and a great place to find when and where they’re on is EstateSales.Org.

EstateSales.Org also know how awesome vintage cast iron is, and they have not only written a great Vintage Cast Iron Guide, but we’re in it!  They interviewed us, and given us permission to reproduce their blog post below.

After reading, make sure you go visit the original article to talk about your finds, which you can find right here.

Vintage Cast Iron Guide

We see a lot of vintage cast iron at estate sales, and it’s always one of the first things to go. The cast iron trend has been heating up for well over a decade. But what’s the big draw? To learn more about cast iron cookware and why vintage cast iron is worth collecting, we did some research and reached out to the women behind The Pan Handler LLC to find out why it’s so hot.

This is what a collection of vintage Griswold cast iron looks like. Griswold cast iron skillets are great to cook with. Photo courtesy of The Pan Handler LLC. Recent Food Trends

Food used to be for sustenance. Now it’s a status symbol. There seem to be a million more cooking shows than there were years ago. There’s even an entire channel dedicated to food. Could this be one reason behind the cast iron craze?

“I think that how food has become a thing is definitely a contributing factor because it’s made more people interested in cooking,” said Anna H, who took over The Pan Handler LCC from Mary T., where she sells vintage and antique cast iron, as well as runs The Pan Handler blog.

Many celebrity chefs prefer cooking with cast iron, and even endorse certain brands, so it makes sense people have jumped on the bandwagon, looking for cast iron at estate sales, in flea markets, and online.

People are also getting savvier about what they put into their bodies and making healthier decisions. Many old unhealthy practices are relics from past decades. Think: microwaves, margarine, and TV dinners. Teflon,too.

While it was great for non-stick cooking, it’s been linked to disease. Cast iron doesn’t leach harmful chemicals into the food. In fact, if it leaches anything, it’s iron, something you could use more of.

Vintage Cast Iron is Highly Collectible

Take it from cast iron collectors who have been at it for awhile. Mary T. even collects vintage stoneware, which is how she first stumbled onto vintage cast iron. She was shopping at Goodwill when she saw a Griswold Gem pan and got curious.

“I didn’t know anything about it, and I kind of just stopped in and bought it. And when I got home and I looked at it, the casting on it was just beautiful, and I liked the markings on it. I liked the way it looked. When I compared it to cast iron of current day, it was such a finer quality, and i just was really drawn to it,” Mary T. said.

Afterwards Mary bought sixty pieces of cast iron on an auction and learned how to clean and season it. It was just the beginning. From there, she started The Pan Handler LLC, a thriving small Internet business. Despite having sold the business to Anna H., Mary continues to blog about vintage cast iron on her new website.

Pre-seasoned vintage cast iron frying pan and lid — Challenge accepted! Estate sale photo. Vintage Cast Iron Is Earth-friendly

Taking care of the environment is important. Ever since the 60s and 70s, cast iron has been popular with the outdoor types and hippies, and now it’s gone mainstream. Because cast iron is so durable, it will last forever.

“I like the idea of reducing, reusing, recycling. So I like the fact that I’m not buying something that’s going to end up in a landfill,” said Mary T.

Why buy a new pot or pan when a cast iron pan cooks just as well (if not better) and will last a lifetime? Its versatility, too, means you don’t need to buy a bunch of “uni-task” tools or cookware.

Cast Iron has a Rich History

Vintage cast iron’s interesting history alone is worth collecting. Cast iron has been around as long as 5 B.C.E, when the Chinese used it for cooking. Cast iron was used all over Europe throughout history, and we still use cast iron Dutch ovens today.

Cast iron also has strong ties to American history when the colonists used cast iron cookware on open fires. Some people are interested in the individual stories of who once owned each piece, and the journey it took to end up in their kitchen.

“I like thinking about where it might have been used, and who might have used it. If you look at The Pan Handler blog, you’ll see a bunch of pictures from the Library of Congress in there and photographs of people using these old pieces of cast iron. . . photographs of tenant farmers that during the Great Depression made little meals on the side of the road in their cast iron,” said Mary T.

She also said Lewis and Clark used cast iron on their big expedition, and that in early America, people would carry their antique cast iron skillets across the country in their covered wagons. Some of them still exist today.

Cast Iron Makes Great Family Heirlooms.

Another reason why cast iron is popular is because they make great family heirlooms. You may have inherited a few pieces yourself and want to continue to pass them on. Or you’re looking to buy vintage cast iron—or possibly even new cast iron—that can stay in the family.

“Besides maybe jewelry, because of modern technology and furniture styles and such, there’s not a lot in terms of family heirlooms can be re-used without appearing out of date,” Anna H pointed out.

“And it’s something that retains its function regardless of what generation you are,” she said.

This Buster Brown waffle iron is an example of the vintage cast iron craftsmanship. Photo courtesy of The Pan Handler LLC. Modern vs. Vintage Cast Iron

Not everything new is better, but that doesn’t mean modern cast iron is worthless either. Good quality craftsmanship gives a piece its value, and as with everything else, old jewelry and vintage engagement rings for example, people once had more time to spend on labor, resulting in finer products.

These days, machines have to do the work of artisans since costs are too high to create each piece by hand. While modern cast iron will also last a lifetime and be fully functional, it just won’t have the attention to detail and craft found in vintage.

How was Vintage Cast Iron Made?

In the 1800s and 1900s, all cast iron cookware was made by hand. Sand molds were formed and iron was melted down and usually combined with scrap iron and/ or steel. Then the mixture was hand poured into a mold, which is the “casting” part of “cast” iron. Doing this by hand allowed for more control, resulting in lighter cookware (modern cast iron can be several pounds heavier). Hand pouring was also key to designing more intricate cookware.

Then the iron has to solidify a.k.a. “controlling the cooling curve,” an important part of the process. If something goes wrong during this stage, the entire project can be thrown. Like if gas gets into it and forms bubbles, a common imperfection in older cast iron pieces.

The way cast iron cools also factors into the final product. Low quality cast iron pieces often haven’t been cooled evenly. Quick cooling produces a finer grain, while slow cooling produces a coarse grain. Once you’ve been collecting cast iron for awhile, you learn all the nuances.

After cooling, vintage cast iron cookware would get smoothed down (also by hand) with a grinding stone, or milled, to make the pan’s surface flat and slick. Collectors refer to this as a “mirror” or “satin” finish, which is one way to distinguish a well-loved vintage cast iron piece.

These days, when everything is produced for the bottom line, cast iron is made with a machine, which means the attention to detail when done by hand gets lost. That’s why machine-made modern cast iron has a rough, pebbly surface, and can weigh a ton.

This Minty Griswold cast iron Crispy Corn Stick Pan pan is all the rage at estate sales and another example of bygone craftsmanship. Photo courtesy of The Pan Handler LLC. Common Myths about Cast Iron

Lots of myths are out there regarding cast iron, which is bound to happen when anything gets popular. Anna and Mary from The Pan Handler LLC have heard them all. Here are some of the biggest myths out there:

It takes a lot of time and elbow grease to clean and restore vintage cast iron! Photo courtesy of The Pan Handler LLC. 1. Cast iron is hard to clean.

Many people steer clear of cast iron because they think it’s difficult to clean and maintain. But that couldn’t be further from the truth! Any cast iron pro will tell you, keeping cast iron clean isn’t rocket science.

“Because the seasoning makes it non-stick, it’s actually a lot easier than a normal pan. So I inherently spend less time cleaning my cast iron that I use every day than I do on any other nonstick or aluminum cookware,” said Anna H.

2. You have to season cast iron when you buy it.

Manufactured cast iron comes seasoned already, and professional cast iron dealers go many lengths to restore and season vintage cast iron before selling it. If you must season it yourself, go ahead. But if you want to get cooking, most cast iron is ready to go.

3. You can never use soap on cast iron.

While we don’t endorse a long soak, a little bit of dish soap won’t hurt your cast iron cookware. This dirty caveat tends to be the thing most people think of when they think about cast iron.

“Sometimes you need a little bit of soap to get some of the more stubborn food particles off,” said Anna H.

“You season your pan every time you cook in it with some fat, so the seasoning builds up over time. And it becomes quite hardy, and it’s going to reseason the next time you cook in it as well, so it’s much better to get the food off your pan and not have it stuck on for the next hundred years than it is to worry about your seasoning,” said Anna H.

She says a drop or two of normal dish soap should do the trick.

These Wagner cast iron roasters found at the O’Neil Family Cast Iron Museum. Photo by S. Lamb Photography, courtesy of The Pan Handler LLC. 4. You have to clean and put it away after every use.

If cast iron gets used every day, it might make sense to put them away after every single meal. A simple wipe-down after every use should suffice. Most cast iron is so lovely it doesn’t look bad sitting out, especially for a rustic kitchen look.

“I have a chain mail scrubber that I use to clean them afterwards and I’m not scared of using a drop of soap,” said Anna H who admits her cast iron “lives” on her stove since she uses it so often.

“The most important thing I do is I dry them immediately after I wash them up, and I pop them back on my stove. If I’m going to be using them again in couple of hours, I don’t do anything else. But if say we’re going away, or it might be a couple of days before I cook, then I’ll spray them with Pam, and wipe them down with olive oil once, and let them sit there until the next time I need them,” she said.

5. Some cast iron is beyond restoration.

While it’s true cast iron can be warped, chipped, or pitted from heat, cast iron has to go through quite a lot to not be functional. This is part of its beauty. Mary T, who admittedly has special tools to restore cast iron, shared a story of the toughest piece she had to get back into shape, a piece that had been buried knee deep in a farm yard. Some people might have tossed it—but not her!

“The process I used for removing rust [from cast iron] was typically electrolysis . . . and a lye bath. (1) The first step, I would place the piece in this lye bath and sometimes it would be in there for weeks, if not months, (2) just taking it out every now and again, and cleaning some of the crud off, putting it back in, taking it out, cleaning some of the crud off, putting it back in and (3) then the final step was the electrolysis. After the electrolysis, (4) I would clean it, and (5) then season it, and then boom! It’s ready to go.”

“So it goes from sitting in the ground in someone’s farm yard to someone’s table!”

Gate marks like this found at the O’Neil Cast Iron Museum, are imperfections, but also prove a piece is an true antique. Photo by S. Lamb Photography, courtesy of The Pan Handler LLC. Tips for Buying Vintage Cast Iron

It can be overwhelming to buy cast iron, especially for a newbie. Here are a few tips from the pros on what to look for:

1. Gate Marks Gate marks mean it’s the real deal: older than 1880 and a true antique. Gate marks were remnants from the casting process, when the piece would “break the mold.” It looks like a slit or gash. If you find cast iron with a gate mark, it hardly matters who the maker is — it’s valuable!

2. Heat Rings Cast iron pans were originally designed to fit on top of wood stoves. Heat rings are around the pan’s rim were meant to raise the cookware so it didn’t directly touch the stovetop. Cast iron with heat rings is vintage because it was made with wood stoves in mind.

3. Maker’s Marks Of course Maker’s marks are great ways to identify vintage cast iron and to learn more about a piece’s history. This Pan Handler blog post has a great post on identifying both marked and unmarked antique cast iron cookware.

4. Warping Over time from improper misuse or storage, it’s possible for vintage cast iron to become warped. If cookware is warped, it won’t distribute heat evenly, which kind of defeats the purpose. Cast iron collector Culinary Fanatic has an informative video on identifying warped cast iron.

5. Made in America Label If you go to many estate sales, you’re bound to come across cast iron with “Made In America” stamped on the underside. This means it’s likely the piece was made around 1960 or afterwards.

“So that means it’s a little less vintage, but you can also be sure that the pan was made in America and it’s not a cheap Asian pan,” said Anna H.

Rare vintage Wapak Indian head medallion cast iron skillets at the O’Neil Cast Iron Museum. Photo by S. Lamb Photography, courtesy of The Pan Handler LLC. The Reasoning Behind Seasoning

Spend five minutes around cast iron lovers, and you’ll hear about seasoning. What the heck is it? Isn’t seasoning the process of adding flavor to food? Yes and no.

Seasoning is also the process of coating a cast iron pan or skillet’s surface with oil and cooking it off in order to produce a non-stick surface you can use again and again. The high heat causes the oil to solidify (forming a “polymer”) on top of the surface, producing that nice thick coating.

After very thinly oiling the pan (so thin it might not look like it’s there), place it face down in the oven and bake on ~350 degrees for about an hour.

Then you rub the surface dry with clean dry towels (make sure it isn’t still hot) to soak up the excess oil The surface should be matte, not glossy. Preseason if needed until you get the finish you’re looking for.

Know that cooking with it too will produce the coating (about five times should do the trick—an incentive start makin’ bacon) so don’t hesitate to get started, especially when much of the cast iron you buy, whether vintage (from a dealer) or modern, will be pre-seasoned and ready to go. Some aficionados swear by flaxseed (while others say it flakes off), but other oils includ canola, coconut, and shortening. The debate lives on.

Vintage Cast Iron Brand Names

Not all cast iron brands are the same. There’s a reason you hear about the same brands over and over (Griswold, Wagner, Wapak, Lodge). They’ve stood the test of time. Of course some vintage cast iron brands are no longer in production, and there are a lot of fakes out there to be aware of.

“To me, Griswold is the most collectible of the cast iron cookware, to me the Griswold pieces are the finest made, the most beautiful and in my experience as a seller, that is also the brand that most people want, most buyers want,” said Mary T.

Anna H also likes Griswold cast iron: “I like the feel of their pans, and the sizes work well for me and they have a solid reputation and they’re very collectible. . .  I also have one particular pan, Oneta, and that was by the manufacturer Wapak, and there aren’t a lot of those around, but the pan I have is so light and is such a delight to work with,” she said.

And don’t forget about Lodge, if you’re into the new cast iron. (The cast iron collectors we talked to weren’t).

“We do have some Lodge, it seems like the hot thing everybody wants, but mostly old Lodge,” said Marg O’Neil, cast iron collector and Cast Iron Museum curator.

Cast iron collectors from all over get together at auctions and conventions to buy pieces, share knowledge, and make friends. Photo courtesy of The Pan Handler LLC. The World’s Only Cast Iron Museum

Did you know there’s a family-owned Cast Iron Museum? It’s in Tacoma, Washington, run by Larry and Marg O’Neil, avid cast iron collectors. They have so much cast iron—we’re talking 13, 000 pieces of cast iron (!!) that they had to build a 3500 square foot building, and then another building across twenty acres to showcase and sell their finds.

They got into collecting cast iron because of Larry, but they also like the camaraderie, a big reason why people become collectors. The O’Neils belong to a wide network of cast iron lovers, the Griswold and Cast Iron Cookware Association(G&CICA), who get together several times a year to share pieces, ask questions, share knowledge, and make friendships.

“We just had a convention in Springfield, Missouri, so we had a Show and Tell. People bring items and they say, We don’t know what this is, or maybe you don’t find very many of them, and then we have a couple seminars on, like one was on Erie skillets and another one was on G.F. Filley pans, and then we have an auction,” said Marg.

Whether you get into vintage cast iron for the craftsmanship, the cooking, the camaraderie or its interesting cultural past, it’s a hobby worth pursuing and a way to connect to something larger.

Do you look for vintage cast iron when you go to estate sales? What pieces have you been lucky enough to find? Talk about it here!

Teriyaki in Cast Iron

Mar 21, 2017

In:Cooking

Whilst there is a big following of comfort food amongst TPH followers, we still like to take our taste buds around the world.  This excerpt below was part of a Washington Post Q&A with food writer Charlotte Druckman, the author of ‘Stir, Sizzle, Bake: Recipes for your Cast Iron Skillet’ (which you can find here on Amazon).

Q: Teriyaki hack in a cast iron skillet?

I noticed that Japanese restaurants with the best teriyaki seem to cut the vegetables, bread the tofu or meat, and pour house made teriyaki sauce over the cast iron plate. Then the plate is broiled until things are golden and sizzly. Could i recreate this at home with a 12″ cast iron skillet? Instead of cast iron plates? My main concern is that the cast iron is needed for the right caramelization, but cooking it this way may leave teriyaki very hard to remove from my skillet without tin foil or ramekins.

A: Charlotte Druckman

You have just warmed my heart because I love cast iron and know a lot more about it than I do Japanese cuisine, which I’m only just beginning to scratch the surface of. You can and should use the cast-iron skillet for this, YES. But, make sure it’s well-seasoned, because that will reduce your changes of sticky-gross teriyaki aftermath significantly. But what I think the real trick to this would be is adding the teriyaki at the very end. If you look at the tsukune recipe in my story, you’ll see that the chicken meatballs are made then set aside, and the glaze for them (not so unlike a teriyaki) is made in a few moments (2 to 3 minutes) in the already-hot skillet, and then the meatballs are just quickly coated in them, in the pan, at the last minute. That’s what I’d do here.

The full Q&A from the Washington Post can be found here.

Happy Cooking!

Anna

 

ChocolateWaffles

Never being one to turn down something involving chocolate, I just happened to run across a recipe for chocolate waffles, which somehow made it into waffle testing!  Unless you’re planning on going into diabetic shock, I would recommend that you save this for dessert rather than breakfast.

The Batter

Mmmmm, chocolate chips.  This batter was fun and easy to make, and it was inspired by our Valentine’s Day post.  The recipe, from Joy the Baker, is here.  It seemed thickish, but workable.  As usual, I made this before heating the waffle iron.

The Cast Iron

In honor of both my love of chocolate, and Valentine’s Day, I used this lovely Antique Andresen Cast Iron Rosette Heart Waffle Iron.  This particular iron has since been snapped up, but I will share that there is another in the restoration process, so if your heart longs for this heart design, it will have a second change.  I substituted the base from my EC Simmons Waffle Iron from Round 2, as it was a better fit for my particular stove.  The iron didn’t fit all that well into the temporary base, and it was a bit of a chore flipping it, so if you want to mix and match, try and stay within the same brand.

Lovely Antique Andresen Cast Iron Rosette Heart Waffle Iron with Base

Let’s Cook!

Wary of overcooking in Round 2, I heated the iron 4 minutes on either side. I didn’t have all the smoke from Round 2 when I opened it up to add batter, so things were looking good.

Somehow, I managed to overcook my first waffle again!  Is anybody sensing a theme here?  Still – the heart shaped waffles look pretty impressive.

First Attempt

I dialed down the heat to medium low and cooked the waffles for about 4 minutes per side, and they came out perfectly!  Once again, we had no sticking problems in the pan.  If you’re going to err, err on the side of overcooking rather than undercooking.  It may be a little crispy, but it will come cleanly out of the waffle iron. If there is uncooked batter, there’s going to be a mess.

I served with whipped cream and strawberries.  The recipe provided also gives you the option to make chocolate sauce, but we found it perfectly balanced with the chocolate chips in the waffles, the cream and the fruit.

Lessons – Round 3

Don’t be afraid to branch out into different waffle flavors, Expect to sacrifice a few waffles to the learning curve. You may need to play with your temperature and cooking times to find what’s right for your iron, Spray Pam on your iron between waffles, Err on overcooking rather than undercooking

ChocolateWaffle

PerfectWaffle

After the success of Round 1 of Waffle Testing, I was excited to get into Round 2, so without further ado, I’m going to quit my waffling and get into it!

The Batter

This batter was from well known chef Alton Brown and I found it on the Food Network, right here!  Like the last round, this recipe uses butter and not oil, but it also adds buttermilk, and mixes both whole wheat and all purpose flour.

Mix the dry ingredients first!

Once again, I made this first to give it time to sit, and once again, it came out really really thick.  Nevertheless, I let it sit, and moved onto heating my iron.

The Waffle Iron

For this round of testing, I used the super unique EC Simmons Keen Kutter Waffle Iron (No. 8).  It looks all innocent from the outside…

But once you open it up, you’ll know that your waffles will not look like all the other waffles out there!

There is no way I would have done waffle testing without using this waffle iron. It is just way too cool!

Let’s Cook!

With this pan, I did the identical  steps to the Griswold in Round 1.  I heated both sides for about 5 mins each on Medium – High, but it was immediately obvious that what worked the first time round wasn’t going to work in Round 2.  The pan was smoking!  The best time to put in the batter is when the pan is just beginning to smoke, but this was about to set off the smoke detectors. Clearly, the EC Simmons pan heats up faster than the Griswold.

I turned the pan down, and put in the batter.  It started cooking way to hard and fast, another indication of a too-hot pan. I took a picture as it was a clear example of what not to do!

A sign of a too hot pan

I reduced the cooking time down to 4 minutes, but I don’t think I reduced the heat enough for this (it was set at Medium), and the waffle ended up browner than I would have liked.

This pan not only heated up faster, but it produces a thinner waffle, so you’ll need to heat up on a lower temperature, and cook for less time to get a great waffle.

The taste, however, was fantastic!  Alton really hit the nail on the head with the flavor.  The waffle didn’t taste dense either, which I attribute to the thinner waffle size.

I tried adding some water too (a cup) and it became quite runny.  It impacted the cooking time (needing less) and it made the waffles almost too light to be able to cope with the toppings I had chosen for today (cottage cheese and blueberries).  In retrospect, Alton’s recipe was perfect the way it was written for this waffle iron.  When diluting batter, don’t do what I did and lump in a cup of water at a time, add it in 1/4 cup increments.  Learn from my mistakes!

Here’s a later waffle with the diluted batter.

And once again, nothing stuck to the paddles!  Clean up was going to be a breeze!

Lessons from Round 2

Use a really cool waffle iron, If your paddles are smoking like a chimney, they’re too hot.  Let them cool a little before pouring in the batter. You may need to play around with the heat time and temperature before you find the perfect setting, You may need to play around with the cooking time before you find the right time for your particular iron You’ll still need to flip the waffle iron to cook both sides of the waffle When diluting batter, add your water in increments and test. You may need to vary the density of your batter depending on your waffle toppings.

Yum!

In Round 3, we’re making Chocolate Waffles, and they will be awesome!

Happy Cooking!

Anna