Home PageAsk The Pan HandlerRound 2 of Wonderful Waffles!

Round 2 of Wonderful Waffles!

PerfectWaffle

After the success of Round 1 of Waffle Testing, I was excited to get into Round 2, so without further ado, I’m going to quit my waffling and get into it!

The Batter

This batter was from well known chef Alton Brown and I found it on the Food Network, right here!  Like the last round, this recipe uses butter and not oil, but it also adds buttermilk, and mixes both whole wheat and all purpose flour.

Isn't this pretty?

Mix the dry ingredients first!

Once again, I made this first to give it time to sit, and once again, it came out really really thick.  Nevertheless, I let it sit, and moved onto heating my iron.

ThickBatter

The Waffle Iron

For this round of testing, I used the super unique EC Simmons Keen Kutter Waffle Iron (No. 8).  It looks all innocent from the outside…

ECSimmons

But once you open it up, you’ll know that your waffles will not look like all the other waffles out there!

OpenIron

There is no way I would have done waffle testing without using this waffle iron. It is just way too cool!

Let’s Cook!

With this pan, I did the identical  steps to the Griswold in Round 1.  I heated both sides for about 5 mins each on Medium – High, but it was immediately obvious that what worked the first time round wasn’t going to work in Round 2.  The pan was smoking!  The best time to put in the batter is when the pan is just beginning to smoke, but this was about to set off the smoke detectors. Clearly, the EC Simmons pan heats up faster than the Griswold.

I turned the pan down, and put in the batter.  It started cooking way to hard and fast, another indication of a too-hot pan. I took a picture as it was a clear example of what not to do!

A sign of a too hot pan

A sign of a too hot pan

I reduced the cooking time down to 4 minutes, but I don’t think I reduced the heat enough for this (it was set at Medium), and the waffle ended up browner than I would have liked.

FinishedFirst

This pan not only heated up faster, but it produces a thinner waffle, so you’ll need to heat up on a lower temperature, and cook for less time to get a great waffle.

The taste, however, was fantastic!  Alton really hit the nail on the head with the flavor.  The waffle didn’t taste dense either, which I attribute to the thinner waffle size.

I tried adding some water too (a cup) and it became quite runny.  It impacted the cooking time (needing less) and it made the waffles almost too light to be able to cope with the toppings I had chosen for today (cottage cheese and blueberries).  In retrospect, Alton’s recipe was perfect the way it was written for this waffle iron.  When diluting batter, don’t do what I did and lump in a cup of water at a time, add it in 1/4 cup increments.  Learn from my mistakes!

Here’s a later waffle with the diluted batter.

PerfectWaffle

And once again, nothing stuck to the paddles!  Clean up was going to be a breeze!

CleanPaddles

Lessons from Round 2

  1. Use a really cool waffle iron,
  2. If your paddles are smoking like a chimney, they’re too hot.  Let them cool a little before pouring in the batter.
  3. You may need to play around with the heat time and temperature before you find the perfect setting,
  4. You may need to play around with the cooking time before you find the right time for your particular iron
  5. You’ll still need to flip the waffle iron to cook both sides of the waffle
  6. When diluting batter, add your water in increments and test.
  7. You may need to vary the density of your batter depending on your waffle toppings.
Yum!

Yum!

In Round 3, we’re making Chocolate Waffles, and they will be awesome!

Happy Cooking!

Anna